Formula 1
Race Centre | Calendar | Standings | Teams | Drivers | Circuits | Series:
Renault

R.S.17
Nico Hulkenberg
(Germany)


Jolyon Palmer
(Great Britain)


Races337 EngineRenault
Wins: 35ChassisR.S.17
Constructors' Championships2BrakesBrembo/AP Racing
Drivers' Championships2Engine Power15,000 RPM
Test DriversSergey SirotkinGearboxSemi-automatic, 8 + reverse
Suspension

Renault's on and off relationship with F1 continues as it returned to the sport as a full-time manufacturer entity in 2016 following a foul spell with Red Bull as an engine supplier in the V6 era. Keen to show what the French manufacturer can bring to the table, the men in suits got back in bed in familiar Enstone (which had been its home from 2002 to 2011) in hope that it can forge a relationship that saw it clinch successive titles in 2005 and 2006. Renault has had a relatively low profile in F1 despite being the sport since 1977 - most of which in the guise of a supplier. But its engines powered many a success - a feat it was determined to achieve on its own pillars to add to its 300 races and 100 podiums. Its history is laced with spotlight names - from Alain Prost to Fernando Alonso - and key technological advances like the turbocharged power plants it introduced in 1977. But its identity - and indeed its success - has always been diluted with it associations with teams. Red Bull has been the case-in point, where the quadruple champions blindfolded all their joint success after Renault came a damp squib with the V6 regulations. It's about time Renault starts writing a script wherein it plays the protagonist rather than a supporting role.Renault's on and off relationship with F1 continues as it returned to the sport as a full-time manufacturer entity in 2016 following a foul spell with Red Bull as an engine supplier in the V6 era. Keen to show what the French manufacturer can bring to the table, the men in suits got back in bed in familiar Enstone (which had been its home from 2002 to 2011) in hope that it can forge a relationship that saw it clinch successive titles in 2005 and 2006. Renault has had a relatively low profile in F1 despite being the sport since 1977 - most of which in the guise of a supplier. But its engines powered many a success - a feat it was determined to achieve on its own pillars to add to its 300 races and 100 podiums. Its history is laced with spotlight names - from Alain Prost to Fernando Alonso - and key technological advances like the turbocharged power plants it introduced in 1977. But its identity - and indeed its success - has always been diluted with it associations with teams. Red Bull has been the case-in point, where the quadruple champions blindfolded all their joint success after Renault came a damp squib with the V6 regulations. It's about time Renault starts writing a script wherein it plays the protagonist rather than a supporting role.


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